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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 385 (some duplicates have been removed)
plan. >> excellence. >> well executed. >> i thank you. >> a lot of criticism of fema back in katrina. today we hear nothing but good about fema. >> i thank craig would lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: not so fast because all in rescueville is not so great. a lot of the folks they represent would like to kick them in the ass. this is the reality. welcome, everyone, not so happy friday. mr. president, you may want to wait on the "heck of a job" thing because rescue efforts have become heck of a joke for folks in the northeast fuming. because the help isn't coming. in gas. no power. no food. they have had it. >> restaurants and boats and homes are looted. >> the coast guard has not been here to help. >> come here and walk into the streets here. the water is this high. you have to wear the waders. >>neil: that is just on staten island. homes are swamps. motorists are stuck if -- in gas lines, four hours or more if you can find a place to fill in. two-thirds of gas stations even now in new york and new jersey remain shut down. out of juice. out of gas. thousands are fuming, out of p
there is no drinking water. >> neil: you and i sxi can remember with katrina, big difference in variety of levels. it was the same immediate response that things were under control. the famous heck of a job brownie comment that prompted the initial view, things are under control and not so bad. then we started getting the images, we started seeing more and more. it was not under control. we're seeing the initial response on the part of president and governor christie and mayor bloomberg and governor of new jersey is still speaking to reporters in hoboken. residents who are affected in these areas, you are talking a good game but it ain't happening to me. that is when it turns the tide. what do you see happening now if this lingers much longer? >> reporter: first of all, thank you for covering this story. i have been watching other stations, they are not covering this station. a lot of americans saw the instant response, this was a storm that was dealt with and very professional and competent manner and fema and state. now, we are finding out thanks in large part that is not the case. i think a lo
their roovs two days after sandy, in scenes reminiscent of katrina. also reports of a desperate search for two children, swept away from their mom in the storm surge. and then word that the death toll had nearly doubled to 14. it was becoming clear that staten island, a sleepy enclave best known as the name sake for the famous staten island ferry, was a world away from the rest of this city which today was getting moving again. so, we hopped in the car outside of our office in manhattan, expecting a journey that would be made very difficult by the city's maddening post-storm grid lock. instead, the real problems became getting gas. we drove around northern new jersey for hours encountering lines and frustrated people. >> aggravating. that storm did its thing. knocked out everything. >> reporter: we were only saved by some relatives of one of our colleagues who brought us a two-gallon jug of gas. >> just keep it. >> reporter: it's okay. finally, we arrived. and look at what we saw next from our window. >> the transformer blew up and took the whole store down. that's my open sign to the store. i
. a housing cyclone that hollowed out more homes that hurricane katrina and sandy combined. the very definition of disaster needs broadening. we need to recapture the initial horror created by those single natural disaster and put it toward the relief of our on going national disasters. the energy gathered by gale force winds has the power to focus our public attention. superstorm sandy may help the electorate focus in the few days that remain in the 2012 presidential campaign. our vote on tuesday will be for a disaster manager and chief taking charge of a country in an economic state of emergency, building a society that leaves all of us more prepared for disaster. at my table is ari melber, msnbc contributor. norry tan dan, kate dawson and david rodi, a reuters columnist and contributor for the atlantic. thank you all for being here. >> i want to start with you. the article, the piece you wrote was about the inequalities that have been revealed in the con te context of sandy. >> i am one of the privileged new yorkers. there has always been divisions in the city but this storm broug
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
after 9/11, thousands of people with the opposite of katrina because fema had control. giving up on individuals helping neighbors, local government, that is a serious problem and why we are bankrupt. all the money that will go out, there is no money in the paint and -- bank so they will just borrow and print and centralize the power to be in washington dc part of that is bureaucratic and in sufficient. john: thank you for all you have done to wake people up. but i fear we will not have much convince -- success convincing people we don't need fema. even though government fails part instinct leads us to assume washington has the best. they don't. they fail all the time. fema fails constantly. after hurricane hugo one senator called it bureaucratic jackasses to get the hell out of the way. they said prove it but after hurricane andrew even in your times reported it is unclear who was in charge of the relief ever. mikulski said the response was seen as a disaster itself. they said they would fix it then came hurricane katrina and nobles to thousand people died. fema often got in the
kind of initial reaction we got after katrina, 2005. i'm not, again not comparing the gravity of the two event but i am comparing the immediate official response over the handling of these events. what i'm also noting is the distinct difference in the media coverage of 2005 versus this storm in 2012. whether it will be an issue a few days from now. pat? >> it could be. what we are seeing, now that the mayor's moment of let them eat cake pass, with the marathon and by the way, i have yet to see him in staten island. >> he has not been there yet. >> doesn't it tell you everything, the people you interviewed said. there is a political effort to run the clock out. with the media, like they've done on libya. just like they've hidden the truth about libya, hide the truth about this in the service of obama's campaign. let's get it straight. >> fox was the first camera crew to go to staten island to show this and others in the media have gone. you can't ignore it. >> there is a disconnect, the politician want to say everything is okay. rereality is this afternoon. what will they do, h
, this storm costs upwards of $50 billion, making it the second costliest storm after katrina. but atlantic city studios are allowed re-entry today. 95 sandy related deaths are reported in the u.s., including two brothers, ages 2 the and 4, and new york city staten island tt he centepicenter of the casu today. many are remaining powerless and they're not homeless, as well. and residents say the response is coming a bit too late. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help immediately. >> msnbc's richard lui is now in staten island with more for us. richard, good morning. >> thomas, very good morning to you. we're right here by the bay. several marinas in staten island and this corner has been hurt so much. if you lived in this area, you would have 30, 40-foot tall yachts sitting in your front yard. i was speaking with representative michael grim a little earlier. this is his district. and i asked him about the shelters. where are people going and what do they need? this is what he told me. >> they need
. so huge. and to compare it to katrina, katrina lost more lives. we lost too many lives, but not close to katrina. but in other ways it's much more devastating than katrina. right now in new york 305,000 homes are seriously damaged or gone. kirsten showed the pictures of some of them that are just gone by fire because the water systems failed, and the wind -- then the electrical systems got shorted; fire, wind. and the, so 305,000 homes seriously damaged or gone. just in new york up to now, there are going to be more that we'll learn about because the flooding is still there in lots of the basements. these are low-lying houses. there were 214,000 total homes gone in katrina of the same level of damage. businesses, 265,000 -- this is just new york. bob will talk about, and frank talked about new jersey which has similar levels of damage. in katrina 18,000 businesses. because of the density of the population, it is a much greater economic impact on our region, of course, and on the nation. than otherwise. so despite all this pain we can't entirely fault those who came before us for build
to be thrown out. and since you're going to hear the memory of katrina invoked more and more in the coming days, like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island. ann curry has more. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a working class neighborhood. and it is kind of like fend for yourself kind of thing. >> reporter: on the streets hit with debris, where the death toll has gone up to at least 19, today, the fury was seen live on television. >> but you need to come here a
of other disasters, from hurricane katrina, to joplin, now think of this. the people in all three of those places are reaching out to help those suffering in those regions tonight. tonight, their story from janet shamlian. >> reporter: hundreds of miles from the despair, everything from diapers to batteries, collected from the people of louisiana, meant for people in new jersey. >> we know what they're suffering in new jersey, we just wanted to do something to help. >> reporter: the effort started simply, at first, just messages of support. like these from hurricane katrina survivors, images that quickly went viral, then, more help. >> some of the first people we saw down here were firefighters from new york, the new york police department and folks from new jersey. everybody came down here and helped us, it is time to help everybody back. >> reporter: there is a similar feeling from joplin, missouri, which was devastated by the tornado. even people living in the fema trailers, the community wanted to help. >> it brought back a lot of memories. >> reporter: lisa dunn and her family lost th
katrina you have a whole bunch of cars taken off the market because they're not usable and all of a sudden used car prices go up, 10, 20, saw the up 20% reported last week d all the way across, diesel oil. we're going to see i across the state it's not just a northeast issue. >> brenda: gary k, what do you think of that? >> toby is absolutely right. whenever you have shortages with an event like this, especially in highly populated area, lumber, building materials, we can run the gamut here. prices go higher and costs go higher to business and consumers and that will definitively effect an economy. especially still trying to get up. a very tough thing to watch. >> brenda: gary b. is it having an impact or limited and temporary? >> the latter brenda, yes. look, it's the less, less temporary and less limited, i think the closer you were to the northeast. so, people obviously on long island, new jersey are going to feel it the most in spikes in prices and people in california feel it less. toby makes a very good point about insurance rates, but i think back to katrina and i did not see, can't
it was obama's katrina, which it is. the jobs report is up. we will check in with karl rove and look at predictions from others as the outcome of tuesday is now pretty much at hand. joining me with reaction to all of this, radio talk show host willie billy cunningham. his radio show is heard nationally across the country on sunday nights. sir, welcome back. ju you are a great american. >> sean hannity, how are you? >> sean: after the photo op,. billy cunningham where does president obama fly? to vegas. meanwhile, it it is beginning to freeze in the northeast. people don't have heat, electricity. the gas stations that are open people are waiting six hours or long are to be able to get gas. he comes to town. he hugs chris christie, photo op and then heads off to vegas. your reaction? >> i would say a few things. number one, i think this is obama's katrina in which he is showing a complete lack of compassion. i can recall a speech he gave in denver in front of 70,000 fans in which he said if you elect me the winds will stop blowing and the oceans will not rise. what happened to the anoi
repetitive. it dulls the ears. here he doesn't have to mention bush. it's in everyone's head. katrina is recalled with the im. talk about fema, people think about the bush legacy. and so, he doesn't have make those contrastic splits, never mind about mitt romney, that helps him because he's doing stuff and it's all out there without the effort. >> you get the unearned assist from michael brown coming out. >> we'll talk about brownie. >> you couldn't ask for that. you couldn't make that bet. >> but there's karen welcome. hi. >> welcome to the show. i want to say, it's not just the presidential thing. it's also -- there's incredibly moving -- let's not forget the human toll this storm's taken. >> absolutely. >> the images of the president consoling americans in the wake of this massive disaster are incredibly powerful images. and what you heard in the president, what you heard from the president on the stump just now was empathy, this sense that he is fighting for you, that you have a seat at the table, middle class, working class americans, that he is there for you. and that fundamenta
, the tales it could tell. listen to this, one that has gone back and forth from louisiana, katrina, and new york for 9/11 and back. now back again the brotherhood of firefighters that is straight ahead. >> those are two cities that share tragedy, have tragedy in common. katrina down there. 9/11 up here. now another one with sandy. so that -- the bond, the fire truck, represents that. >>> also, we'll lighten the mood a little bit in "the skinny," she says, maybe not too much. she is going to be fine. talking about brooke burke from abc's "dancing with the stars," when the word cancer is involved we'll have to send her our very best thoughts and warm wishes. details of her condition. she is going to be okay the important thing. stay tuned for details coming up on that in "the skinny". >> what her doctors are telling her. our prayers and thoughts go out to her and her family. first, victims and relatives of those who died were in the courtroom as a judge reaffirmed that jared loughner would never again be a free man. >>> part of a plea deal, loughner was sentenced to seven consecutive life ter
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
. it is not katrina but we are a close second. >>shepard: any time your house is without power or full of water or on the ground you have your own private katrina. a lot of the people staying at your hotel which is not normal, they are from there. >>guest: yes, we own two hotel s in the same parking lot here so we have been here for ten years and we have opened up at the world trade center so we are used to disaster. no one realized how bad this is and on wednesday when we thought the people who are here if a couple of days would leave, we thought it would get better and it was not getting better, we called the marathon people and said we would not send our neighbors into the street and we are going to need to tell the marathon people they is to go someplace else. >>shepard: you are not the only one calling the marathon people. this is a cover of the "new york post" owned by the parent company saying abuse of power, with generators that will power tenths for the marathon folks. listen to what happened on fox business network, where we share resources. here is what happened: charlie gasparino sa
they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
that katrina could never happen here. but it has happened. and as they pump the tunnels and open the subways, iconic landmarks are twisted and broken, and still we find bodies, and revise upward the count of the dead. and now frustration and fear of the future haunt many, as homeowners scramble to salvage whatever is left and ask when the pain and suffering will stop. and to the long gaslines and impassable roads, broken infrastructure, and lost hours of work and schools add this weather alert. to those living without power in those houses comes word that the temperatures are cooling. down to the low 30s for tonight, and for the next several nights. and much worse than the cold. another nor easter, another wet and windy storm this way comes. >> and bad weather, ladies and gentlemen, the last thing the battered burrough of stat ten eileen need. let's fine out what else mother now has in store. meteorologist justin poric, what's going on? >> well, geraldo, this is the last thing that residents of in the northeast want to think about, a potential storm. this will not be sandy. will not be a big
to try this. lis? >>lis: i think so. it happened with katrina in 2005. victims sued fema and actually won. you can sue for gross negligence. it is a contract. here is what i argue to this gentleman on the screen and other people there. as a woman who had literary her roof blown off i am not unbiased on this. you have a contract with fema. we all do, to take kay of discuss protect us if a hall disaster like this. if they do not come through, which they have not in a month for many people as we have seen you can sue for breach of contract, gross negligence. >> two words: sovereign immunity you cannot sue a federal government or the agencies unless they give up a waiver. there is an exception of the gross negligence and willful conduct but that is not what he was saying, they have 475,000 people to need. for us be able to manage the catastrophe, the storm of a century, it is impossible for us to get there and give them the help they need under the immediate circumstances. >>lis: we are talking a month. >>guest: right now we have to do a look and see. >>lis: look and see? look and see? >>gue
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 385 (some duplicates have been removed)